Summer 2019 Syllabus

LABETTE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

MASTER SYLLABUS

 

COURSE NUMBER:                         COMM 101

 

COURSE TITLE:                               FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH

 

SEMESTER CREDIT HOURS:        3

 

DEPARTMENT:                                Communication

 

DIVISION:                                         General Education

 

MASTER SYLLABUS AUTHOR:    Tonya D. Bell, Associate Professor of Communication

 

INSTRUCTOR:                                  Name: Lacey Finley

                                                            Email: laceyf@labette.edu

 

PREREQUISITE:                              None

 

REVISION DATE:                             March 2019


TEXT AND SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS USED IN THE COURSE: (if any)

Human Communication, 5th Edition Custom Text, by Pearson, Nelson, Titsworth, Harter, McGraw-Hill.

ISBN 0078139848

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

A basic study in communication theory and its practical application at all levels: interpersonal (understanding the self), interpersonal (one-to-one relationships and small group interaction), and public speaking.  Students examine factors that influence the development of self-concept and interpersonal relationships, participate in problem solving panel discussions, deliver informative and persuasive speeches, and improve their critical listening and thinking skills.

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COURSE OUTCOMES AND COMPETENCIES:

The learning outcomes and competencies detailed in this course outline or syllabus meet or exceed the learning outcomes and competencies specified by the Kansas Core Outcomes Groups project for this course as approved by the Kansas Board of Regents.

Kansas Regents Shared Number Course COM 1010

 

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

 

  1. Apply terms and theories of oral and nonverbal communication in evaluation of speeches, in class activities, and group discussions.

      Incorporate the six functions of communication when evaluating the effectiveness of a speech and interpersonal communication.

  • Incorporate the theories of self-perception and perception of others in their analysis of the effectiveness of a speech.
  • Identify and critique the effectiveness of nonverbal communication of various speakers.
  • Analyze and critique informative speeches based on the methods and principles of informative speeches.
  • Recognize and critique the motivational techniques and emotional appeals used in persuasive speeches.

 

  1. Demonstrate effective public communication skills in their speeches.
  • Complete a minimum of four speeches that include a written assignment, peer review and increasingly rigorous research.
  • Compose and transmit a message suitable to the topic, purpose, and audience.
  • Incorporate a goal, introduction, thesis statement, detailed body, conclusion, and references in an outline for the majority of speeches.
  • Develop an extemporaneous delivery while using their outlines during their speeches.
  • Demonstrate nonverbal theories of communication by using body movements, paralanguage, and self-presentation during their speeches.
  • Identify and critique the nonverbal communication of audience members.

 

  1. Demonstrate effective listening with literal and critical comprehension.
  • Identify the main ideas in structured and unstructured discourse.
  • Distinguish between those ideas that support the main ideas and those that do not.
  • Demonstrate awareness that one’s knowledge, experience and emotions affect listening.
  • Identify the organization of the speaker’s ideas and information.
  • Distinguish between assertions that are verifiable and those that are not.
  • Analyze the information and inferences in order to draw conclusions.

 

WEEKLY COURSE OUTLINE:

Please note: This is a tentative weekly overview of the course schedule and is subject to change.

Unit

Chapter

Discussion

Assignment

Speech

Quiz

Unit 1

Chapter 1

Introduction Discussion


Screencast Confirmation

 

Course Understanding
Chapter 1

Unit 2

Chapter 2
Chapter 3

Unit 2 Discussion

Outline

 

Chapter 2
Chapter 3

Unit 3

Chapter 4
Chapter 5

Unit 3 Discussion

Personal Tastes Assessment

Introduction

Chapter 4
Chapter 5

Unit 4

Chapter 10
Chapter 11

Unit 4 Discussion

Citation Exercise
Outline

 

Chapter 10
Chapter 11

Unit 5

Chapter 12
Chapter 13

Unit 5 Discussion

 

Demonstration

Chapter 12
Chapter 13

Unit 6

Chapter 14

Unit 6 Discussion

Outline

 

Chapter 14

Unit 7

Chapter 15

Unit 7 Discussion

 

Informative

Chapter 15

Unit 8

 

Final Discussion

Speech Critique

 

 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:

Lecture/class discussions, readings from the text, computer presentations, videos, handouts, group work, and both in and out-of-class assignments/projects.

 

METHODS OF EVALUATION:

The instructor reserves the right to modify, add, and/or take away assignments based on the circumstances that develop during the semester.

 

Possible Points:

 

Chapter

Discussion

Pts

Assignment

Pts

Speech

Pts

Quiz

Pts

Unit 1

Chapter 1

Introduction Discussion

15


Screencast Confirmation

20

 

 

Course Understanding
Chapter 1

30
10

Unit 2

Chapter 2
Chapter 3

Unit 2 Discussion

30

Outline

30

 

 

Chapter 2
Chapter 3

20

Unit 3

Chapter 4
Chapter 5

Unit 3 Discussion

30

Personal Tastes Assessment

50

Introduction

100

Chapter 4
Chapter 5

20

Unit 4

Chapter 10
Chapter 11

Unit 4 Discussion

30

Citation Exercise
Outline

75
30

 

 

Chapter 10
Chapter 11

20

Unit 5

Chapter 12
Chapter 13

Unit 5 Discussion

30

 

 

Demonstration

100

Chapter 12
Chapter 13

20

Unit 6

Chapter 14

Unit 6 Discussion

30

Outline

30

 

 

Chapter 14

10

Unit 7

Chapter 15

Unit 7 Discussion

30

 

 

Informative

100

Chapter 15

10

Unit 8

 

Final Discussion

30

Speech Critique

100

 

 

 

 

 

Grade:

Final course grades are determined by the total point accumulation of all grades from speeches, audience responses/evaluations, class assignments/activities, quizzes, the mid-term and final, and attendance. Percentages are not rounded.  Since this is a speech class, all major speeches must be completed in order to fulfill course requirements.  Not doing so will result in failure of the course.

 

The grading scale for speeches:

90% – 100% = A         Student does an outstanding speech.  Excellent content, well organized, excellent wording – good eye contact and an energetic delivery – and/or superior accomplishment on the criteria established for that speech.

80% – 89% = B           Speech approaching the qualities of an “A” speech.  A good speech, not necessarily any major weaknesses, but not achieving a standard of excellence in any or enough areas to merit an “A”.  A good job in meeting most established criteria for that speech.

70% – 79% = C           An acceptable speech.  Reasonably clear purpose, adequate support, apparent organization, but may not be entirely clear to the entire audience, some problems in wording or delivery or both; and/or some deficiencies in meeting many of the major criteria established for the speech.

60 – 69% = D              An unclear purpose and serious deficiencies in some and perhaps all areas of content, organization; and/or poor delivery.

59% & Below = F        The student does not give the speech at all or simply demonstrates that there has been no preparation in content or delivery.

 

Speeches:

The majority of speeches are to be delivered extemporaneously; that is, they are prepared beforehand but wording, although practiced, is determined during the actual speech.  When outlines are required, they must be prepared before the speech is given and handed in on the first day of speeches.  They count as part of the speech grade and should be done neatly (typed) and thoroughly.  All speeches must be delivered when scheduled.  Major speeches missed by the student, regardless of cause, must be given when time permits in order for the student to receive a passing grade for the course.  The amount of reduced credit for a make-up speech, if any, will depend upon the nature of the absence and is at the discretion of the instructor.

 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

Daily activities in the classroom are designed to accomplish many of the objectives of the course; therefore, students should attend every class.  If a student will be absent, notify the instructor before missing class—this applies to all absences, including LCC sponsored events.  If an emergency occurs and it is not possible to notify the instructor prior to class, contact the instructor within the same day of the missed class to discuss the absence.  Failure to do so will result in a full letter grade dock on all speeches and zeros on all other assigned work/activities.  If a student contacts the instructor and the absence is excused, arrangements can be made to complete the missed work upon return.  On presentation days, students will only be excused for officially approved LCC events, a documented illness, or bereavement.  Students who make a habit of providing excuses for absences that are not school related will be required to schedule a conference with the instructor and provide written documentation regarding the nature of the absences.

 

Attendance is taken at the start of class.  Students must actively participate in roll call and in-class activities and discussions in order to be counted present.  If a student enters the classroom after the instructor has started roll call, they will be counted tardy.  3 tardies will result in 1 unexcused absence.  Since attendance and participation are critical, if a student exceeds 6 unexcused absences for Monday/Wednesday/Friday sections or 4 unexcused absences for Tuesday/Thursday sections they may be dropped from the course.

 

All students will receive a grade for the course after the last day to withdraw for the semester regardless of the number of absences.

 

CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR:

Disruptive behavior that hinders the learning process is grounds for being dropped from class.  The following behaviors are considered disruptive or unacceptable:

  • Sleeping
  • Using cell phones or other electronic devices not previously approved by the instructor
  • Inappropriate language or distracting/inappropriate chatting
  • Disrespectful responses and comments to classmates or the instructor
  • Interrupting or disrespecting classmates during presentations (please do not enter or leave the room during presentations except for emergencies)

 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:

Students who need special assistance should contact ADA Coordinator by calling the Human Resources office at (620) 421-6700, ext.1230, or visit the Business Office on the main campus.

 

ADDITIONAL CLASSROOM POLICIEIS AVAILABLE AT:

www.labette.edu/students/classroom_policies.pdf

  • Academic Honesty, Cell Phone in Classroom, Children (Guests) in Classroom, Code of Conduct, Tobacco Use, Weather

 

COMMUNICATION:

All communication concerning this course or college business will be sent to your LCC student e-mail address.  It is your responsibility to check this account regularly.

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